Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/106298
Authors: 
Johansson, Per
Karimi, Arizo
Nilsson, J. Peter
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy 2014:9
Abstract: 
This paper studies gender differences in the extent to which social preferences affect workers' shirking decisions. Using exogenous variation in work absence induced by a randomized field experiment that increased treated workers' absence, we find that also non-treated workers increased their absence as a response. Furthermore, we find that male workers react more strongly to decreased monitoring, but no significant gender difference in the extent to which workers are influenced by peers. However, our results suggest significant heterogeneity in the degree of influence that male and female workers exert on each other: conditional on the potential exposure to same-sex co-workers, men are only affected by their male peers, and women are only affected by their female peers.
Subjects: 
peer effects
employer-employee data
work absence
randomized field experiment
JEL: 
C23
C93
J24
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
728.58 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.