Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/105510
Authors: 
Faria, Joao Ricardo
Year of Publication: 
1998
Series/Report no.: 
Department of Economics Discussion Paper, University of Kent 9811
Abstract: 
This paper studies the expulsion of Jews from Spain in 1492. This forced migration process is addressed with a model that blends demographic, religious and macroeconomic features. The optimal migration path is derived. It is shown that a large portion of the Sephardim community fled the country and, given the confiscation process they suffered, their final income was smaller than the income just before the expulsion. The model provides several predictions: (1) the rate of growth of the country falls with the migration; (ii) an increase in the inflation rate decreases the final income of the Jews; (iii) the government has an incentive to denerate inflation since this minimises the negative impact of the diaspora on the rate of growth; and (iv) the decision to reduce the activities of the Spanish Inquisition diminished the migration.
Subjects: 
Migration
Confiscation
Discrimination
JEL: 
D99
J19
J61
J79
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
91.24 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.