Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/104760
Authors: 
Dingel, Jonathan I.
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
WTO Staff Working Paper ERSD-2014-13
Abstract: 
A growing literature suggests that high-income countries export high-quality goods. Two hypotheses may explain such specialization, with different implications for welfare, inequality, and trade policy. Fajgelbaum, Grossman, and Helpman (JPE 2011) formalize the Linder (1961) conjecture that home demand determines the pattern of specialization and therefore predict that high-income locations export high-quality products. The factor-proportions model also predicts that skill-abundant, high-income locations export skill-intensive, high-quality products (Schott, QJE 2004). Prior empirical evidence does not separate these explanations. I develop a model that nests both hypotheses and employ microdata on US manufacturing plants' shipments and factor inputs to quantify the two mechanisms' roles in quality specialization across US cities. Home-market demand explains at least as much of the relationship between income and quality as differences in factor usage.
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
493.01 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.