Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/104742
Authors: 
Roth, Steffen
Year of Publication: 
2011
Citation: 
[Journal:] Journal of Sociocybernetics [Volume:] 20 [Issue:] 9 [Pages:] 19-34
Abstract: 
Despite its influence in Central European sociology, N. Luhmann’s Social Systems theory remains a marginal branch of international sociology. In this paper, the theory questions the reasons for its own marginality in general and for its marginality in the Anglophone centers of sociology in particular, with the latter still being a surprise against the background of the theory’s cybernetic roots in the US. The theory arrives at the conclusion that, while Europe, or ‘the continent’, is still perceived as old compared with the Anglophone new world(s), it still is Anglophone sociology that preserves ‘Old European’ semantics. Sociology in continental ‘Old Europe’, however, seems to have a chance of slowly being acquainted with a new, post-enlightenment mindset focused on semantics and communication rather than on humans and action.
Subjects: 
Luhmann
Sociology
Communication
Social Systems Theory
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.