Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/103573
Authors: 
Linna, Kenneth
Moore, Evan
Paul, Rodney
Weinbach, Andrew
Year of Publication: 
2014
Citation: 
[Journal:] International Journal of Financial Studies [ISSN:] 2227-7072 [Publisher:] MDPI [Place:] Basel [Volume:] 2 [Year:] 2014 [Issue:] 2 [Pages:] 179-192
Abstract: 
Clock rule changes were introduced in the 2006 season with the goal of reducing the average duration of the game; these changes were reversed in 2007. In addition, in 2007 the kickoff rule was changed to create more excitement and potentially more scoring. We examine what happened to actual and expected scoring during these National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) football seasons. The clock rule change in 2006 led to lower scoring which was not fully encompassed in the betting market, leading to significant returns to betting the under. Multiple rule changes in 2007 led to volatility in the betting market that subsided by season's end.
Subjects: 
rule change
amateur sports
scoring
gambling
betting
market efficiency
prediction markets
JEL: 
L83
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size
237.19 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.