Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/103540
Authors: 
Chiswick, Barry R.
Gindelsky, Marina
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 8488
Abstract: 
This paper analyzes the determinants of bilingualism (i.e., speaks a language other than English at home) among children age 5 to 18 years in the American Community Survey, 2005-2011. Two groups of children are considered: those born in the US (native born) and foreign-born children who immigrated prior to age 14 (the 1.5 generation). The analyses are conducted overall, within genders, and within racial and ethnic groups. Bilingualism is more prevalent if the parents are foreign born, less proficient in English, of the same ancestry (linguistic) group, and if the child lives in an ethnic (linguistic) concentration area. Although the effects are relatively smaller, a foreign-born grandparent living in the household increases child bilingualism, while a higher level of parental education tends to decrease it. Children of Asian and especially of Hispanic origin are more likely to be bilingual than their white, non-Hispanic counterparts. Native-born Indigenous children are more likely to be bilingual.
Subjects: 
bilingualism
native born children
immigrant children
family
JEL: 
J15
J24
I21
Z13
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
294.06 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.