Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/103530
Authors: 
Koch, Alexander K.
Nafziger, Julia
Nielsen, Helena Skyt
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 8470
Abstract: 
During the last decade knowledge about human behavior from psychology and sociology has enhanced the field of economics of education. By now research recognizes cognitive skills (as measured by achievement tests) and soft skills (personality traits not adequately measured by achievement tests) as equally important drivers of later economic outcomes, and skills are seen as multi-dimensional rather than one-dimensional. Explicitly accounting for soft skills often implies departing from the standard economic model by integrating concepts studied in behavioral and experimental economics, such as self-control, willingness to compete, intrinsic motivation, and self-confidence. We review how approaches from behavioral economics help our understanding of the complexity of educational investments and outcomes, and we discuss what insights can be gained from such concepts in the context of education.
Subjects: 
non-cognitive skills
schooling
educational decision making
soft skills
behavioral economics
JEL: 
D03
I20
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
304.79 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.