Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/103526
Authors: 
Heath, Rachel
Mobarak, A. Mushfiq
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 8483
Abstract: 
We study the effects of explosive growth in the Bangladeshi ready-made garments industry on the lives on Bangladeshi women. We compare the marriage, childbearing, school enrollment and employment decisions of women who gain greater access to garment sector jobs to women living further away from factories, to years before the factories arrive close to some villages, and to the marriage and enrollment decisions of their male siblings. Girls exposed to the garment sector delay marriage and childbirth. This stems from (a) young girls becoming more likely to be enrolled in school after garment jobs (which reward literacy and numeracy) arrive, and (b) older girls becoming more likely to be employed outside the home in garment-proximate villages. The demand for education generated through manufacturing growth appears to have a much larger effect on female educational attainment compared to a large-scale government conditional cash transfer program to encourage female schooling.
Subjects: 
ready-made garment exports
Bangladesh
marriage
fertility
schooling
JEL: 
O12
F16
I25
J23
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
621.06 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.