Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/103115
Authors: 
Parry, Ian
Veung, Chandara
Heine, Dirk
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
CESifo Working Paper 5015
Abstract: 
This paper calculates, for the top twenty emitting countries, how much pricing of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions is in their own national interests due to domestic co-benefits. On average, nationally efficient prices are substantial, $57.5 per ton of CO2 (for year 2010), reflecting primarily health co-benefits from reduced air pollution at coal plants and, in some cases, reductions in automobile externalities (net of fuel taxes/subsidies). Pricing co-benefits reduces CO2 emissions from the top twenty emitters by 13.5 percent. However, co-benefits vary dramatically across countries (e.g., with population exposure to pollution) and differentiated pricing of CO2 emissions therefore yields higher net benefits (by 23 percent) than uniform pricing.
Subjects: 
carbon pricing
co-benefits
air pollution
fuel taxes
top twenty emitters
JEL: 
H23
Q48
Q54
Q58
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.