Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/102633
Authors: 
Ashraf, Quamrul
Galor, Oded
Klemp, Marc
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, Brown University, Department of Economics 2014-4
Abstract: 
This research establishes that migratory distance from the cradle of anatomically modern humans in East Africa and its effect on the distribution of genetic diversity across countries has a hump-shaped effect on nighttime light intensity per capita as observed by satellites, reflecting the trade-off between the beneficial and the detrimental effects of diversity on productivity. The finding lends further credence to the hypothesis that a significant portion of the variation in the standard of living across the globe can be attributed to factors that were determined in the distant past.
Subjects: 
Nighttime light intensity
Out of Africa Hypothesis of Comparative Development
Genetic Diversity
Comparative Development
migratory distance from Africa
JEL: 
N10
N30
N50
O10
O50
Z10
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
874.86 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.