Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/102630
Authors: 
Arbath, Cemal Eren
Ashraf, Quamrul
Galor, Oded
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, Brown University, Department of Economics 2013-15
Abstract: 
This research empirically establishes that the emergence, prevalence, and recurrence of civil conflict in the modern era reflect the long shadow of prehistory. Exploiting variations across contemporary national populations, it demonstrates that genetic diversity, as determined pre-dominantly tens of thousands of years ago, has contributed significantly to the frequency, incidence, and onset of both overall and ethnic civil conflicts over the last half century, accounting for a large set of geographical and institutional correlates of civil conflict, as well as measures of economic development. These findings arguably reflect the adverse effect of genetic diversity on interpersonal trust and cooperation, the potential impact of genetic diversity on income inequality, the potential association between genetic diversity and divergence in preferences for public goods and redistributive policies, and the contribution of genetic diversity to the degree of fractionalization and polarization across ethnic and linguistic groups in the population.
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
612.36 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.