Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Guidolin, Massimo
Ravazzolo, Francesco
Tortora, Andrea Donato
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
Manchester Business School Working Paper 619
This paper analyzes the empirical performance of two alternative ways in which multi-factor models with time-varying risk exposures and premia may be estimated. The first method echoes the seminal two-pass approach advocated by Fama and MacBeth (1973). The second approach is based on a Bayesian approach to modelling the latent process followed by risk exposures and idiosynchratic volatility. Our application to monthly, 1979-2008 U.S. data for stock, bond, and publicly traded real estate returns shows that the classical, two-stage approach that relies on a nonparametric, rolling window modelling of time-varying betas yields results that are unreasonable. There is evidence that all the portfolios of stocks, bonds, and REITs have been grossly over-priced. On the contrary, the Bayesian approach yields sensible results as most portfolios do not appear to have been misspriced and a few risk premia are precisely estimated with a plausible sign. Real consumption growth risk turns out to be the only factor that is persistently priced throughout the sample.
Bayesian estimation
Latent jumps
Stochastic volatility
Linear factor models
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.