Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/102332
Authors: 
Brück, Tilman
Ferguson, Neil T. N.
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 8451
Abstract: 
In 1998, the Good Friday Agreement concluded a period of violence in Northern Ireland yet the scars of the conflict remained prevalent in the political landscape. Rival communities remained divided, economic performance was poor and intercommunity tensions frequently manifested. In a bid to reinforce progress towards a peaceful and stable society, over €1bn of public money was spent between 2000 and 2006 on small-scale community and business ventures. Despite the scale of expenditure, however, little rigorous effort has been made to test the success of the programmes. Splitting Northern Ireland into 582 electoral wards, we merge individual-level on perceptions of neighbourhood quality from the British Household Panel Survey with detailed PEACE II accounts. Noting potential selection and omitted variables biases, we implement two-stage random effects models and show that neither level of spending, nor number of projects, in a region is associated with improvements in perceptions of neighbourhood quality.
Subjects: 
aid intervention
peacebuilding
terrorism
political violence
Northern Ireland
PEACE II
EU Structural Fund
The Troubles
JEL: 
D74
F35
H56
I38
O18
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
1.01 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.