Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/101883
Authors: 
Belton, Willie
Huq, Yameen
Uwaifo Oyelere, Ruth
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 8384
Abstract: 
In this paper we explore the relationship between ethnic fractionalization and social capital. First, we test for time differences in the impact of ethnic fractionalization on social capital using U.S. data from 1990, 1997 and 2005. Subsequently we examine the data for evidence of the conflict, contact and hunker-down theories espoused by Putman in explaining what happens over time when individuals interact with those of differing ethnicities. We find no evidence of heterogeneity in the impact of ethnic fractionalization on social capital over time. In addition we find evidence of the conflict theory and no evidence of hunker-down or contact theories. Our results suggest that as communities become more diverse, there is a tendency for social capital to decline.
Subjects: 
ethnic fractionalization
social capital
trust
diversity
social networks
JEL: 
D71
Z10
J10
J19
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
298.75 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.