Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/101878
Authors: 
Janiak, Alexandre
Wasmer, Etienne
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 8362
Abstract: 
Employment protection (EPL) has a well known negative impact on labor flows as well as an ambiguous but often negative effect on employment. In contrast, its impact on capital accumulation and capital-labor ratio is less well understood. The available empirical evidence suggests a non-monotonic relation between capital-labor ratios and EPL: positive at very low levels of EPL, and then negative. We explore the theoretical effects of EPL on physical capital in a model of a firm facing labor frictions. Under standard assumptions, theory always implies a motononic negative link between capital-labor ratios and EPL. For a positive link to arise, a very specific pattern of complementarity between capital and workers protected by EPL (senior workers, as opposed to unprotected new entrants, or junior workers) has to be assumed. Further, no standard production technology is able to reproduce the inverted U-shape pattern of the data. Instead, endogenous specific skills investment leads to an inverted U-shape pattern: EPL protects and therefore induces investments in specific skills. We develop such a model and calibrate the returns to seniority by using estimates from the empirical literature. Under complementarity between capital and specific human capital, physical capital and senior workers having accumulated specific human capital are de facto complement production factors and EPL may increase capital demand at the firm level. The paper concludes that labor market institutions may sometimes favor physical and human capital investments in second-best environments.
Subjects: 
employment protection
specific skills
unemployment
capital-labor ratios
JEL: 
J60
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
602.49 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.