Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/101264
Authors: 
Winters, L. Alan
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
ADBI Working Paper Series 464
Abstract: 
This paper covers threes issues: first, defining and measuring inclusive growth; second, the relationship between international trade and inequality; and third, the links between infrastructure and inequality. Both international trade and infrastructure make it easier for people to exchange goods and services and to increase income by allowing specialization, economies of scale, variety, etc. The gains are important not only in aggregate, but also at an individual level, and different people's ability to take advantage of them varies. Hence each can increase inequality. Critical to sharing the gains from trade is mobility - specifically labor mobility, which determines the capacity of people to move from areas, sectors, skills, or firms of low or declining opportunity to those of higher opportunity. In the context of inclusive growth, this constitutes a challenge. However, the answer should not be to eschew opening up the economy or building infrastructure, but to do so in an informed way and seek to undertake complementary policies that help the less well-off take advantage of them.
Subjects: 
trade
infrastructure
inequality
labor mobility
trade opening
globalization
JEL: 
F16
F64
H54
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
302.17 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.