Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/101095
Authors: 
Lindner, Florian
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
Working Papers in Economics and Statistics 2013-19
Abstract: 
Entry decisions in market entry games usually depend on the belief about how many others are entering the market, the belief about the own rank in a real effort task, and subjects' risk preferences. In this paper I am able to replicate these basic results and examine two further dimensions: (i) the level of strategic sophistication, which has a positive impact on entry decisions, and (ii) the impact of time pressure, which has a (partly) negative influence on entry rates. Furthermore, when ranks are determined using a real effort task, differences in entry rates are explainable by higher competitiveness of males. Additionally, I show that individual characteristics are more important for the entry decision in more competitive environments.
Subjects: 
Market entry game
Time pressure
Level-k reasoning
Risk
Competitiveness
Experiment
JEL: 
C72
C91
D81
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
342.56 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.