Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/100874
Authors: 
Espinosa-Vega, Marco A.
Smith, Bruce D.
Yip, Chong K.
Year of Publication: 
2000
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta 2000-16
Abstract: 
Until recently, the trend in world capital markets has been toward increasing "globalization." Recent events in Latin America and Asia have forced a rethinking of the desirability of unrestricted world capital flows. In this paper we ask whether simple restrictions on capital mobility can succeed in reducing the volatility of funds flows, whether such restrictions are consistent with the long-term development of the countries that might impose them, whether such restrictions are beneficial for poorer countries while harming wealthier countries, and whether barriers to capital movements should be reduced in magnitude as the development process proceeds. ; We find first that appropriately selected barriers to capital movements can be used by a poorer country to eliminate the short-term volatility of capital flows and other economic volatility as well. Second, we find that these barriers are consistent with increased rather than reduced levels of economic development in both the short and long run. Third, we show that it is empirically plausible that such barriers will be reduced over time as economies develop. Fourth, we show that, in the long run, all countries can benefit from the presence of barriers to capital mobility. And, fifth, we show that barriers to capital mobility can increase the magnitude of net capital flows in a steady state.
Subjects: 
International economic relations
International finance
Capital movements
Monetary policy
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
592.17 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.