Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/100727
Authors: 
Orphanides, Athanasios
Williams, John C.
Year of Publication: 
2003
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta 2003-21
Abstract: 
Central banks pay close attention to inflation expectations. In standard models, however, inflation expectations are tied down by the assumption of rational expectations and should be of little independent interest to policy makers. In this paper, the authors relax the assumption of rational expectations with perfect knowledge and reexamine the role of inflation expectations in the economy and in the conduct of monetary policy. Agents are assumed to have imperfect knowledge of the precise structure of the economy and the policymakers' preferences. Expectations are governed by a perpetual learning technology. With learning, disturbances can give rise to endogenous inflation scares, that is, significant and persistent deviations of inflation expectations from those implied by rational expectations. The presence of learning increases the sensitivity of inflation expectations and the term structure of interest rates to economic shocks, in line with the empirical evidence. The authors also explore the role of private inflation expectations for the conduct of efficient monetary policy. Under rational expectations, inflation expectations equal a linear combination of macroeconomic variables and as such provide no additional information to the policy maker. In contrast, under learning, private inflation expectations follow a time-varying process and provide useful information for the conduct of monetary policy.
Subjects: 
Equilibrium (Economics)
Monetary policy
Macroeconomics
Inflation (Finance)
Forecasting
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
253.25 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.