EconStor >
The University of Utah, Salt Lake City >
Department of Economics, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City >
Department of Economics Working Paper Series, University of Utah >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/64440
  
Title:A 2-equation model of the North Atlantic economies, a dynamic panel study PDF Logo
Authors:Kiefer, David
Issue Date:2010
Series/Report no.:Working Paper, University of Utah, Department of Economics 2010-06
Abstract:Carlin and Soskice (2005) advocate a 3-equation model of stabilization policy to replace the conventional IS-LM-AS model. One of their new equations is a monetary reaction rule MR derived by assuming that governments have performance objectives, but are constrained by an augmented Phillips curve PC. They label their replacement model the IS-PC-MR. Central banks achieve the PC-MR solution by setting interest rates along an IS curve. Observing that governments have more tools than just the interest rate, we simplify their model to 2 equations. We develop a state space econometric specification as the solution of these equations, adding a random walk model of the unobserved potential growth. Applying this method to a panel of North Atlantic countries, we find it historically consistent with a few qualifications. For one, governments are more likely to target growth rates, than output gaps. And, inflation expectations are more likely backward looking, than rational, but a two-step estimation based on a forward-looking sticky-price model dramatically improves the empirical fit. Significant interdependence can be seen in the between-country covariance of inflation and growth shocks.
Subjects:New Keynesian
Kalman filtering
open economies
JEL:E61
E63
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:Department of Economics Working Paper Series, University of Utah

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
638661285.pdf265.51 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/64440

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.