Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Kulvik, Martti
Linnosmaa, Ismo
Hermans, Raine
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
ETLA Discussion Papers, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy (ETLA) 1037
New technological applications are usually expected to increase the health care costs. But they can also spawn cost savings in the long run, for example, when making time-consuming diagnostic methods more efficient and facilitating targeted therapy. This study analyses how the implementation of new technological applications in acute treatment affects the long-term cost structure of health care. The non-monetary utility is compared to cost-efficiency impacts of a new technology. A theoretical apparatus is constructed and utilized in two empirical cases: thrombolytic therapy for stroke, and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) on glioblastoma-type brain cancers. The empirical cases indicate how the monetary cost-efficiency of the new technologies can be related to the nonmonetary patient utility.
technology, health care, costs
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
349.16 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.