Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/62610
Authors: 
Galor, Oded
Year of Publication: 
2009
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, Brown University, Department of Economics 2009-10
Abstract: 
This paper explores the implications of Unified Growth Theory for the origins of existing differences in income per capita across countries. The theory sheds light on three fundamental layers of comparative development. It identifies the factors that have governed the pace of the transition from stagnation to growth and have thus contributed to contemporary variation in economic development. It uncovers the forces that have sparked the emergence of multiple growth regimes and convergence clubs, and it underlines the persistent effects that variations in pre-historical biogeographical conditions have generated on the composition of human capital and economic development across the globe.
Subjects: 
Growth
Comparative Development
Globalization
Technological Progress
Demographic Transition
Diversity
Human Capital
Malthusian Stagnation
JEL: 
F40
O11
O14
O15
O33
O40
J10
J13
N0
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
524.93 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.