EconStor >
Federal Reserve Bank of New York >
Staff Reports, Federal Reserve Bank of New York >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/60804
  
Title:Have amenities become relatively more important than firm productivity advantages in metropolitan areas? PDF Logo
Authors:Deitz, Richard
Abel, Jaison R.
Issue Date:2008
Series/Report no.:Staff Report, Federal Reserve Bank of New York 344
Abstract:We analyze patterns of compensating differentials to determine whether a region's bundle of site characteristics has a greater net effect on household location decisions relative to firm location decisions in U.S. metropolitan areas over time. We estimate skill-adjusted wages and attribute-adjusted rents using hedonic regressions for 238 metropolitan areas in 1990 and 2000. Within the framework of the standard Roback model, we classify each metropolitan area based on whether amenities or firm productivity advantages dominate and analyze the extent to which these classifications change between 1990 and 2000. We then decompose compensating differentials into amenity and firm productivity advantage components and examine how these components change. Empirical results suggest that while the relative importance of amenities appears to have increased slightly between 1990 and 2000, firm productivity advantages continued to dominate amenities in the vast majority of metropolitan areas during this decade.
Subjects:Compensating differentials
quality of life
productivity
JEL:R23
R30
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:Staff Reports, Federal Reserve Bank of New York

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
587562528.pdf124.66 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/60804

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.