EconStor >
Yale University >
Economic Growth Center (EGC), Yale University >
Center Discussion Papers, Economic Growth Center (EGC), Yale University >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/59165
  
Title:The gender and generational consequences of the demographic transition and population policy: An assessment of the micro and macro linkages PDF Logo
Authors:Schultz, T. Paul
Issue Date:2009
Series/Report no.:Center Discussion Paper, Economic Growth Center 979
Abstract:The demographic transition changes the age composition of a population, affecting resource allocations at the household and aggregate level. If age profiles of income, consumption, savings and investments were stable and estimable for the entire population, they might suggest how the demographic transition would affect inputs to growth. However, existing macro and micro simulations are estimated from unrepresentative samples of wage earners that do not distinguish sex, schooling, etc. The demographic dividend” is better evaluated through case studies of household surveys and long-run social experiments. Matlab, Bangladesh, extended a family planning and maternal and child health program to half the villages in its district in 1977, and recorded fertility in the program villages was 16 percent lower than in control villages for the following two decades until 1996. Households in program villages realized health and productivity gains that were concentrated among women, while child survival and schooling increased, and household physical assets were 25 percent greater per adult than in control villages.
Subjects:fertility decline
demographic transition
intergenerational transfers
gender
JEL:J13
J21
J68
O15
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:Center Discussion Papers, Economic Growth Center (EGC), Yale University

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
610727478.pdf80.73 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/59165

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.