EconStor >
Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen >
Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät, Universität Tübingen >
University of Tübingen Working Papers in Economics and Finance >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/55271
  
Title:On the human capital of Inca Indios before and after the Spanish conquest: Was there a "pre-colonial legacy"? PDF Logo
Authors:Juif, Dácil-Tania
Baten, Joerg
Issue Date:2012
Series/Report no.:University of Tübingen working papers in economics and finance 27
Abstract:Not only the colonial period, but also the pre-colonial times might have influenced later development patterns. In this study we assess a potential pre-colonial legacy hypothesis for the case of the Andean region. In order to analyze the hypothesis, we study the human capital of Inca Indios, using age-heaping-based techniques to estimate basic numeracy skills. We find that Peruvian Inca Indios had only around half the numeracy level of the Spanish invaders. The hypothesis holds even after adjusting for a number of potential biases. Moreover, the finding has also crucial implications for the narrative of the military crisis of the Inca Empire. A number of explanations have been given as to why the Old American Empires were not able to defend their territory against the Spanish invaders in the early 16th century. We add an economic hypothesis to the debate and test it with new evidence: Were the human capital formation efforts of the Inca economy perhaps too limited, making it difficult to react appropriately to the Spanish challenge?
Subjects:human capital
age-heaping
Inca empire
inequality
growth
JEL:I25
N30
N36
O15
Persistent Identifier of the first edition:urn:nbn:de:bsz:21-opus-60289
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:University of Tübingen Working Papers in Economics and Finance

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
685296539.pdf976.47 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/55271

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.