Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/53998
Authors: 
Fenske, James
Year of Publication: 
2011
Series/Report no.: 
Working paper // World Institute for Development Economics Research 2011,29
Abstract: 
Tree crops have changed land tenure in Africa. Farmers have acquired more permanent, alienable rights, but have also faced disputes with competing claimants and the state. I show that the introduction of Para rubber had similar effects in the Benin region of colonial Nigeria. Farmers initially obtained land by traditional methods. Mature farmswere assets that could be sold, let out, and used to raise credit. Disputes over rubber involved smallholders, communities of rival users, would-be migrant farmers, commercial plantations, and the colonial state, which feared rubber would make land unavailable for food crops.
Subjects: 
Africa
Nigeria
tree crops
rubber
land tenure
land conflict
JEL: 
N57
O13
ISBN: 
978-92-9230-392-1
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
463.97 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.