Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Schaffer, Axel
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
Working paper series in economics 31
Regional economic policy disposes of two principal options to attract private capital, which in turn helps to safeguard employment and to foster regional growth. On the one hand, regional policy could seek to enhance a region's level of public capital (e.g. transport infrastructure), which as a consequence makes the region more attractive to private investors in general. On the other hand, private capital could be attracted in a more direct way by proposing specific innovation, SME or cluster programs. The success of both options is partly driven by the regions already existing level of region specific production factors and the ability to use these factors efficiently. Indirect approaches to attract private capital seem to be particularly promising for efficient regions (no matter of the absolute level of public capital). In contrast, inefficient regions shall benefit more from specific programs. However, for Germany the factual pattern seems to be the other way around, which could widening rather than closing the income gap among regions.
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.