EconStor >
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen >
cege - Centrum für Europa-, Governance- und Entwicklungsforschung, Universität Göttingen >
cege-Diskussionspapiere, Universität Göttingen >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/32027
  
Title:How effective are poor schools? Poverty and educational outcomes in South Africa PDF Logo
Authors:van der Berg, Servaas
Issue Date:2008
Series/Report no.:CeGE Discussion Paper 69
Abstract:There is a well-known debate about the roles of geography versus institutions in explaining the long-term development of countries. These debates have usually been based on cross-country regressions where questions about parameter heterogeneity, unobserved heterogeneity, and endogeneity cannot easily be controlled for. The innovation of Acemoglu, Johnson and Robinson (2001) was to address this last point by using settler mortality as an instrument for geography-induced endogenous institutions and found that this supported their line of reasoning. We believe there is value-added to consider this debate at the micro level within a country as particularly questions of parameter heterogeneity and unobserved heterogeneity are likely to be smaller than between countries. Moreover, at the micro level it is possible to identify more precise transmission mechanisms from geography via institutions to economic development outcomes. In particular, we examine the determinants of economic development across villages on the Indonesian Island of Sulawesi and find that geography-induced endogenous emergence of land rights is the critical institutional link between geographic conditions and technological change. We therefore highlight and empirically validate a new transmission channel from endogenously generated institutions on economic development.
Subjects:geography
migration
land rights
technology adoption
agricultural development
Indonesia
JEL:J21
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:cege-Diskussionspapiere, Universität Göttingen

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
558658229.pdf672.63 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/32027

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.