Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/26542
Authors: 
Carson, Scott Alan
Year of Publication: 
2008
Series/Report no.: 
CESifo working paper 2497
Abstract: 
Vitamin D is vital in all vertebrates because it allows them to absorb more calcium from their diets, contributing to stronger skeletal systems and stature growth. Using a new source of 19th century US state prison records, this study contrasts the statures of comparable African-Americans and whites by the primary sources of vitamin D production: time exposed to solar radiation, skin pigmentation, and nativity. Greater insolation (vitamin D production) is documented here to be associated with taller black and white statures, and a considerable share of the stature differential by socioeconomic status was related to insolation.
Subjects: 
Socioeconomic status
vitamin D
insolation
19th century US statures
JEL: 
I10
J01
J15
J16
N81
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
207.55 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.