Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/18501
Authors: 
Rainer, Helmut
Siedler, Thomas
Year of Publication: 
2006
Series/Report no.: 
DIW Discussion Papers 608
Abstract: 
In most industrialized countries, more people than ever are having to cope with the burden of caring for elderly parents. This paper formulates a model to explain how parental care responsibilities and family structure interact in affecting children?s mobility characteristics. A key insight we obtain is that the mobility of young adults crucially depends on the presence of a sibling. Our explanation is mainly, but not exclusively, based on a sibling power effect. Siblings compete in location and employment decisions so as to direct parental care decisions at later stages towards their preferred outcome. Only children are not exposed to this kind of competition. This causes an equilibrium in which siblings not only exhibit higher mobility than only children, but also have better labor market outcomes. Using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP) and from the American National Survey of Families and Households (NSFH), we find strong evidence that confirms these patterns. The implications of our results are then discussed in the context of current population trends in Europe and the United States.
Subjects: 
Geographic Mobility
Intergenerational Relationships
Care of the Elderly
Family Bargaining
JEL: 
C13
J14
D19
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
708.16 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.