Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/67325
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHunt, Jenniferen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-15en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-07T16:57:05Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-07T16:57:05Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/67325-
dc.description.abstractI use the 1993 and 2003 National Surveys of College Graduates to examine the higher exit rate of women compared to men from science and engineering relative to other fields. I find that the higher relative exit rate is driven by engineering rather than science, and show that 60% of the gap can be explained by the relatively greater exit rate from engineering of women dissatisfied with pay and promotion opportunities. I find that family-related constraints and dissatisfaction with working conditions are only secondary factors. The relative exit rate by gender from engineering does not differ from that of other fields once women's relatively high exit rates from male fields generally are taken into account.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aInstitute for the Study of Labor (IZA) |cBonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aDiscussion Paper Series, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit |x6885en_US
dc.subject.jelJ16en_US
dc.subject.jelJ44en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordscience and engineering workforceen_US
dc.subject.keywordgenderen_US
dc.subject.stwStudiumen_US
dc.subject.stwAkademikeren_US
dc.subject.stwWissenschaften_US
dc.subject.stwIngenieurwissenschaften_US
dc.subject.stwStudierendeen_US
dc.subject.stwAbbrecheren_US
dc.subject.stwFrauenen_US
dc.subject.stwUSAen_US
dc.titleWhy do women leave science and engineering?en_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn727519247en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US

Files in This Item:
File
Size
345.32 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.