EconStor >
The University of Nottingham >
Centre for Research in Economic Development and International Trade (CREDIT), The University of Nottingham >
CREDIT Research Papers, The University of Nottingham >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/65478
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBleaney, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorDimico, Arcangeloen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-19en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-24T12:02:38Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-24T12:02:38Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/65478-
dc.description.abstractWe use new data on the timing of the transition to agriculture, developed by Putterman and Trainor (2006), to test the theory of Diamond (1997) and Olsson and Hibbs (2005) that an earlier transition is reflected in higher incomes today. Our results confirm the theory, even after controlling for institutional quality and other geographical factors. The date of transition is correlated with prehistoric biogeography (the availability of wild grasses and large domesticable animal species). The factors conducive to high per capita incomes today are good institutions, an early transition to agriculture, access to the sea and a low incidence of fatal malaria. Geographical influences have been at work in all of these proximate determinants of per capita income.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherCentre for Research in Economic Development and International Trade, Univ. of Nottingham Nottinghamen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCREDIT Research Paper 08/15en_US
dc.subject.jelO11en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordagricultureen_US
dc.subject.keywordgeographyen_US
dc.subject.keywordgrowthen_US
dc.subject.keywordinstitutionsen_US
dc.subject.stwEntwicklungen_US
dc.subject.stwLandwirtschaften_US
dc.subject.stwGeographieen_US
dc.subject.stwVolkseinkommenen_US
dc.subject.stwWirtschaftsgeschichteen_US
dc.subject.stwWelten_US
dc.titleBiogeographical conditions, the transition to agriculture and long-run growthen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn607310111en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:CREDIT Research Papers, The University of Nottingham

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
607310111.pdf165.43 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.