EconStor >
The University of Nottingham >
Centre for Research in Economic Development and International Trade (CREDIT), The University of Nottingham >
CREDIT Research Papers, The University of Nottingham >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/65468
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeyaro, Vincenten_US
dc.contributor.authorMorrissey, Oliveren_US
dc.contributor.authorOwens, Trudyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-13en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-24T12:02:24Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-24T12:02:24Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/65468-
dc.description.abstractThis paper analyses the effect of food price changes on household consumption (welfare) in Tanzania during the 1990s and 2000s, and simulates the welfare effect attributable to tax (tariffs and VAT) reforms, distinguishing both static (first order) and dynamic (full price) effects of price changes. The three rounds of the Tanzania Household Budget Survey (1991/92, 2000/01 and 2007) are used to estimate consumers'responses using Deaton's method, based on median unit values (prices) and household budget shares. These are then utilized, first to evaluate the distributional impacts of the relative food price changes on consumer welfare in terms of compensating variation and secondly to organise the households into quintiles to simulate the effect of indirect (tariffs and VAT) tax changes on consumer welfare. The results indicate that, in real terms, price increases have worsened the welfare of most consumers during the 1990s and 2000s; the poor, in particular the rural poor, bore much of the brunt compared to the non-poor (in particular the urban non-poor). The welfare losses in the 2000s were greater than those in the 1990s. Although we cannot establish explicit links between tax reforms and domestic food price changes, the simulation shows that tax reforms tended to offset the welfare losses for all household groups. However, the non-poor and urban poor benefit more in relative terms from tax reforms; the rural poor benefit least (and to the extent that pass through is incomplete we overstate the benefit to rural households).en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherCentre for Research in Economic Development and International Trade, Univ. of Nottingham Nottinghamen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCREDIT Research Paper 10/01en_US
dc.subject.jelH20en_US
dc.subject.jelH31en_US
dc.subject.jelO55en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordPrice Changesen_US
dc.subject.keywordConsumer Welfareen_US
dc.subject.keywordTariff Reformsen_US
dc.subject.keywordTanzaniaen_US
dc.subject.stwNahrungsmittelversorgungen_US
dc.subject.stwNahrungsmittelpreisen_US
dc.subject.stwPrivater Haushalten_US
dc.subject.stwSteuerpolitiken_US
dc.subject.stwSoziale Lageen_US
dc.subject.stwTansaniaen_US
dc.titleFood price changes and consumer welfare in Tanzania 1991 - 2007en_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn643905847en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:CREDIT Research Papers, The University of Nottingham

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
643905847.pdf418.35 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.