EconStor >
The University of Nottingham >
Centre for Research in Economic Development and International Trade (CREDIT), The University of Nottingham >
CREDIT Research Papers, The University of Nottingham >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/65461
  
Title:Aggregation versus heterogeneity in cross-country growth empirics PDF Logo
Authors:Eberhardt, Markus
Teal, Francis
Issue Date:2011
Series/Report no.:CREDIT Research Paper 11/08
Abstract:The cross-country growth literature commonly uses aggregate economy datasets such as the Penn World Table (PWT) to estimate homogeneous production function or convergence regression models. Against the background of a dual economy framework this paper investigates the potential bias arising when aggregate economy data instead of sectoral data is adopted in macro production function regressions. Using a unique World Bank dataset we estimate production functions in agriculture and manufacturing for a panel of 41 developing and developed countries (1963-1992). We employ novel empirical methods which can accommodate technology heterogeneity, variable nonstationarity and the breakdown of the standard crosssection independence assumption. We focus on technology heterogeneity across sectors and countries and the potential for biased estimates due to aggregation and empirical misspecification, relying on both theory and empirical evidence. Using data for a stylised aggregate economy made up of agricultural and manufacturing sectors we confirm substantial bias in the technology coefficients and thus any total factor productivity measures computed. Our empirical findings imply that sectoral structure is of crucial importance in the analysis of growth and development, thus strengthening the recent revival of research on structural change in development economics.
Subjects:dual economy model
cross-country production function
aggregation bias
technology heterogeneity
common factor model
panel time series econometrics
JEL:O47
O11
C23
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:CREDIT Research Papers, The University of Nottingham

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
683936816.pdf503.81 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/65461

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.