EconStor >
The University of Nottingham >
Centre for Research in Economic Development and International Trade (CREDIT), The University of Nottingham >
CREDIT Research Papers, The University of Nottingham >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/65457
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMilner, Chrisen_US
dc.contributor.authorMorrissey, Oliveren_US
dc.contributor.authorZgovu, Eviousen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-24T12:02:08Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-24T12:02:08Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/65457-
dc.description.abstractThe direct effects of EPAs on ACP countries arise from the requirement to eliminate tariffs on most imports from the EU. While consumers gain from cheaper imports, the government losses tariff revenue and producers face increased completion, implying adjustment costs. This paper estimates the consumer welfare and revenue impact for a sample of 34 ACP countries of eliminating tariffs on imports from the EU under an EPA, and discusses the associated adjustment costs. Although the ACP overall and on average experiences consumer welfare gains, the gains (or any losses) are small and associated with significant revenue losses and potential adjustment costs. As the gains are associated with increased imports from the EU, larger welfare gains tend to be associated with larger revenue losses and adjustment costs. There is scope for tax substitution to address revenue concerns, but addressing adjustment costs (especially employment) will be much more difficult. ACP countries can exclude up to 20% of imports from the EU from tariff elimination (sensitive products). The paper argues that regionally traded goods should be classified as sensitive and excluded from liberalization. Although this reduces consumer welfare gains (or increases welfare losses), these are likely to be more than offset by the benefits from lower revenue losses and trade effects that reduce adjustment costs. This also serves to encourage increased intra-regional trade: regional exporters gain from the preservation of their regional market share and in all countries domestic producers are likely to produce some regionally traded goods.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherCentre for Research in Economic Development and International Trade, Univ. of Nottingham Nottinghamen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCREDIT Research Paper 09/05en_US
dc.subject.jelF14en_US
dc.subject.jelF15en_US
dc.subject.jelF17en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordACPen_US
dc.subject.keywordEPAsen_US
dc.subject.keywordImportsen_US
dc.subject.keywordWelfare Effectsen_US
dc.subject.keywordIntegrationen_US
dc.subject.stwInternationale Wirtschaftsbeziehungenen_US
dc.subject.stwHandelsabkommenen_US
dc.subject.stwAußenhandelspräferenzen_US
dc.subject.stwWohlfahrtsanalyseen_US
dc.subject.stwEU-Staatenen_US
dc.subject.stwAKP-Staatenen_US
dc.titleEU-ACP economic partnership agreements and ACP integrationen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn63445059Xen_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:CREDIT Research Papers, The University of Nottingham

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
63445059X.pdf124.1 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.