EconStor >
ifo Institut – Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung an der Universität München >
CESifo Working Papers, CESifo Group Munich >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/64846
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCallaway, Branten_US
dc.contributor.authorGhosal, Viveken_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-26en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-11T15:55:39Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-11T15:55:39Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/64846-
dc.description.abstractWe empirically examine the determinants of adoption of information technology by primary healthcare clinics using a large sample of physician clinics from several States in the U.S. Ours is one of the first studies to intensively investigate primary care clinics. These clinics are important as they represent the frontlines in the delivery of services in this large and complex market. Our study generates several interesting results related to the adoption and diffusion of Health Information Technology (HIT), including: (1) the adoption probabilities vary considerably by the specific type of clinic; (2) in contrast to numerous studies in the broader technology adoption literature, we find little evidence to suggest a relationship between firm (clinic) size and the likelihood of adoption; (3) there appears to be no definitive relationship between the age of a clinic and the likelihood of adoption; (4) there is a strong effect of geographic location, as measured by specific types of urban and rural counties, on the likelihood of adoption; (5) market competitive forces appear to have a mixed influence on adoption; (6) there is a distinct State-specific effect suggesting that information privacy, medical malpractice laws and State initiatives may play an important role in adoption; and (7) HIT is diffusing at a faster rate over time. Our findings have the potential to provide a better understanding of the longer-run effectiveness and efficiency in the provision of healthcare, and crafting appropriate policy responses. We note some future extensions of our work.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherCESifo Münchenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCESifo Working Paper: Industrial Organisation 3925en_US
dc.subject.jelO33en_US
dc.subject.jelI11en_US
dc.subject.jelI18en_US
dc.subject.jelM15en_US
dc.subject.jelM21en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordhealthcareen_US
dc.subject.keywordprimary careen_US
dc.subject.keywordhealth information technologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordelectronic medical recordsen_US
dc.subject.keywordtechnologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordadoptionen_US
dc.subject.keyworddiffusionen_US
dc.subject.keywordurban and rural locationsen_US
dc.subject.keywordcompetitionen_US
dc.subject.keywordhealthcare policyen_US
dc.subject.stwBasisgesundheitsversorgungen_US
dc.subject.stwE-Healthen_US
dc.subject.stwInformationstechniken_US
dc.subject.stwInnovationsdiffusionen_US
dc.subject.stwUSAen_US
dc.titleAdoption and diffusion of health information technology: The case of primary care clinicsen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn72645320Xen_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:CESifo Working Papers, CESifo Group Munich

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
72645320X.pdf829.07 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.