EconStor >
Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), London >
cemmap working papers, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/64742
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCunha, Flavioen_US
dc.contributor.authorHeckman, James J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchennach, Susanne M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-03en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-16T13:12:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-16T13:12:10Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.pidoi:10.1920/wp.cem.2010.0910en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/64742-
dc.description.abstractThis paper formulates and estimates multistage production functions for children's cognitive and noncognitive skills. Skills are determined by parental environments and investments at different stages of childhood. We estimate the elasticity of substitution between investments in one period and stocks of skills in that period to assess the benefits of early investment in children compared to later remediation. We establish nonparametric identfication of a general class of production technologies based on nonlinear factor models with endogenous inputs. A by-product of our approach is a framework for evaluating childhood and schooling interventions that does not rely on arbitrarily scaled test scores as outputs and recognizes the differential effects of the same bundle of skills in different tasks. Using the estimated technology, we determine optimal targeting of interventions to children with different parental and personal birth endowments. Substitutability decreases in later stages different parental and personal birth endowments. Substitutability decreases in later stages of the life cycle in the production of cognitive skills. It is roughly constant across stages of the life cycle in the production of noncognitive skills. This finding has important implications for the design of policies that target the disadvantaged. For most configurations of disadvantage, it is optimal to invest relatively more in the early stages of childhood than in later states.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherCentre for Microdata Methods and Practice Londonen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriescemmap working paper CWP09/10en_US
dc.subject.jelC31en_US
dc.subject.jelJ13en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordcognitive skillsen_US
dc.subject.keywordnoncognitive skillsen_US
dc.subject.keyworddynamic factor analysisen_US
dc.subject.keywordendogeneity of inputs anchoring test scoresen_US
dc.subject.keywordparental in influenceen_US
dc.subject.stwIntelligenzen_US
dc.subject.stwBildungsniveauen_US
dc.subject.stwKinderen_US
dc.subject.stwBildungsinvestitionen_US
dc.subject.stwElternen_US
dc.subject.stwFamiliensoziologieen_US
dc.subject.stwFaktorenanalyseen_US
dc.subject.stwSch├Ątzungen_US
dc.subject.stwTheorieen_US
dc.subject.stwUSAen_US
dc.titleEstimating the technology of cognitive and noncognitive skill formationen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn632184426en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:cemmap working papers, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
632184426.pdf1.23 MBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.