Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/64630
Authors: 
Ebert, Hannes
Flemes, Daniel
StrĂ¼ver, Georg
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
GIGA Working Papers 206
Abstract: 
Rising powers have attracted tremendous interest in international politics and theory. Yet the ways in which secondary powers strategically respond to regional changes in the distribution of power have been largely neglected. This article seeks to fill this gap by presenting a systematic comparative analysis of the different types of and causes of contestation strategies undertaken by secondary powers. Empirically, it focuses on two contentious regional dyads in East and South Asia, exploring how structural, behavioral, and historical factors shape the way in which Japan and Pakistan respond, respectively, to China's and India's regional power politics. The paper concludes that the explanatory power of these factors depends on the particular context: in the case of Japan, China's militarily assertive regional role has invoked the most significant strategic shifts, while in the case of Pakistani contestation, shifts in polarity have had the largest impact on the strategic approach.
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
688.5 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.