EconStor >
Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), London >
IFS Reports, Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/64589
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeicester, Andrewen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-01T12:53:44Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-01T12:53:44Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-903274-47-7en_US
dc.identifier.pidoi:10.1920/re.ifs.2006.0068en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/64589-
dc.description.abstractThis report takes a broad overview of the UK environmental tax system as it exists in 2006. It aims to bring together evidence and data from a range of sources to provide a central source of information about the existing environmental tax system, alongside discussion of the key principles of the debate around using taxes and other economic instruments for environmental goals. The report assesses broad trends over time - both in environmental tax revenues and in greenhouse gas emissions, the latter with respect to the government's own emissions-reduction targets and the Kyoto Protocol. It also examines current measures case by case, considering and commenting on the history, motivation, design and implementation of each tax, evidence on the effects (both intentional and perhaps unintentional), trends in revenue and, where important, any distributional implications. Taxes are considered under three broad headings: transport, natural resources and energy. The report looks at new taxes designed explicitly for environmental ends (such as the climate change levy), taxes that were not environmental in intention but have environmental consequences (such as fuel duty), taxes that were altered to incorporate a more obvious environmental objective (such as changes to VAT) and non-tax measures that nevertheless provide economic incentives for pollution reduction (such as the UK and EU Emissions Trading Schemes). The report is not designed to be prescriptive - it does not suggest or encourage that particular policies be changed or introduced, nor does it try to estimate how far current policy will go in the future to meet environmental objectives. Rather, it is designed as a factual overview of where current policy has taken us. However, it does consider some possible future reforms to the environmental tax system - road user charging, carbon taxes and taxes on packaging waste (plastic carrier bags) - that have been suggested. In a report of this nature, it is, of course, extremely difficult to summarise the findings as a whole for each part of the environmental tax system. Some of the key results, both general and for particular tax measures, are, however, presented here.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherInst. of Fiscal Studies Londonen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIFS Reports, Institute for Fiscal Studies R68en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.titleThe UK tax system and the environmenten_US
dc.typeResearch Reporten_US
dc.identifier.ppn726075809en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:IFS Reports, Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
726075809.pdf1.28 MBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.