EconStor >
University of California (UC) >
UC Santa Cruz, Economics Department >
Working Papers, Economics Department, UC Santa Cruz >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/64500
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAizenman, Joshuaen_US
dc.contributor.authorKendall, Jakeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-22en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-28T12:41:28Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-28T12:41:28Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/64500-
dc.description.abstractThis paper investigates the internationalization of venture capital (VC) and private equity (PE) investments. We derive flows between countries of VC and PE investments worldwide, relying on comprehensive firm-level data sources, covering three decades and about 100 countries. A gravity analysis indicates that distance, common language, and colonial ties are significant factors in directing these flows. Additionally, the presence of high-end human capital, a better business environment, high levels of military expenditure, and deeper financial markets are important local factors that attract international venture capital. There is also evidence of path dependency and persistence in VC and PE flows, indicating network effects and fixed costs of entry may be at work. Further analysis suggests the internalization of VC and PE is an ongoing story. Prior to the 1990s, VC was primarily a US-only phenomenon. The globalization of IT activities induced the US venture capital industry to mature, and to start exporting its unique skills as VC managers. The US is now a dominant net exporter of deals, though most crossborder deals are still either to or from the US. China has emerged as the dominant net importer, followed by Sweden, Canada, the UK, India and France. For deals outside the US, cross-border participation has been the norm, while US-located deals have been almost exclusively domestic, involving a higher percent of international participation only after 2001. In the past few years, domestic VC and PE capacity has begun to emerge in many countries where it did not exist previously.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherUniv. of California at Santa Cruz, Dep. of Economics Santa Cruz, Calif.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWorking Papers, UC Santa Cruz Economics Department 644en_US
dc.subject.jelF15en_US
dc.subject.jelF21en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordventure capitalen_US
dc.subject.keywordgravity equationen_US
dc.subject.keywordpath dependenceen_US
dc.subject.keywordcross border flowsen_US
dc.subject.stwKapitalmobilit├Ąten_US
dc.subject.stwGlobalisierungen_US
dc.subject.stwTechnischer Fortschritten_US
dc.subject.stwDirektinvestitionen_US
dc.subject.stwRisikokapitalen_US
dc.subject.stwPrivate Equityen_US
dc.subject.stwWelten_US
dc.titleThe internationalization of venture capital and private equityen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn587693940en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:Working Papers, Economics Department, UC Santa Cruz

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
587693940.pdf231.81 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.