EconStor >
The University of Utah, Salt Lake City >
Department of Economics, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City >
Department of Economics Working Paper Series, University of Utah >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/64477
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBerik, Günselien_US
dc.contributor.authorKongar, Ebruen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-25en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-28T12:40:29Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-28T12:40:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/64477-
dc.description.abstractThe U.S. economic crisis and recession of 2007-2009 accelerated the convergence of women's and men's employment rates as men experienced disproportionate job losses and women's entry into the labor force gathered pace. Using the American Time Use Survey (ATUS) data for 2003-2010, this study examines whether the narrowing gap in paid work over this period was mirrored in unpaid work, personal care and leisure time. We find that the gender gap in unpaid work followed a U-pattern, narrowing during the recession but widening afterwards. Through segregation analysis we trace this U-pattern to the slow erosion of gender segregation in housework and through a standard decomposition analysis of time use by employment status we show that this pattern was mainly driven by movement towards gender equitable unpaid hours of women and men with the same employment status. In addition, over the business cycle gender inequality in leisure time increased.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherUniv. of Utah, Dep. of Economics Salt Lake City, Utahen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWorking Paper, University of Utah, Department of Economics 2011-16en_US
dc.subject.jelD13en_US
dc.subject.jelJ16en_US
dc.subject.jelJ22en_US
dc.subject.jelJ64en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordEconomics of Genderen_US
dc.subject.keywordUnemploymenten_US
dc.subject.keywordTime Useen_US
dc.subject.keywordEconomic Crisesen_US
dc.titleTime use of mothers and fathers in hard times and better times: The US business cycle of 2003-2010en_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn67052669Xen_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:Department of Economics Working Paper Series, University of Utah

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
67052669X.pdf232.48 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.