EconStor >
University of Massachusetts (UMass Amherst) >
Department of Economics, University of Massachusetts >
Working Papers, Department of Economics, University of Massachusetts >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/64196
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDevaro, Jeden_US
dc.contributor.authorKurtulus, Fidan Anaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-08en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-25T07:18:36Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-25T07:18:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/64196-
dc.description.abstractUsing data from a large cross-section of British establishments, we ask how different firm characteristics are associated with the predicted benefits to organizational performance from using team production. To compute the predicted benefits from using team production, we estimate structural models for financial performance, labor productivity, and product quality, treating the firm's choices of whether or not to use teams and whether or not to grant teams autonomy as endogenous. One of the main results is that many firm characteristics are associated with larger predicted benefits from teams to labor productivity and product quality but smaller predicted benefits to financial performance. For example, this is true for union recognition as measured by the number of recognized unions in an establishment. Similarly, when a particular firm characteristic is associated with lower benefits from teams to labor productivity or product quality, the same characteristic is frequently associated with higher predicted benefits to financial performance. This is true for the degree of financial participation and employee ownership and also for establishment size and a number of industries. These results highlight the advantages of analyzing broader measures of organizational performance that are more inclusive of the wide spectrum of benefits and costs associated with teams than the labor productivity measures frequently studied in the teams literature.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherUniv. of Massachusetts, Dep. of Economics Amherst, Mass.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWorking Paper, University of Massachusetts, Department of Economics 2011-16en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.titleWhat types of organizations benefit from teams, and how do they benefit?en_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn668009608en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:Working Papers, Department of Economics, University of Massachusetts

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
668009608.pdf292.87 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.