EconStor >
United Nations University (UNU) >
World Institute for Development Economics Research (UNU-WIDER), United Nations University >
WIDER Research Papers, United Nations University (UNU) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/63418
  
Title:On the arbitrariness and robustness of multi-dimensional poverty rankings PDF Logo
Authors:Qizilbash, Mozaffar
Issue Date:2004
Series/Report no.:Research Paper, UNU-WIDER, United Nations University (UNU) 2004/37
Abstract:It is often argued that multi-dimensional measures of well-being and poverty—such as those based on the capability approach and related views—are ad hoc. Rankings based on them are not, for this reason, robust to changes in the selection of weights used. In this paper, it is argued that the extent of potential arbitrariness and the range of issues relating to robustness have been underestimated in this context. Several issues relating to both the identification of the poor and the use of dimension-specific data are distinguished. These issues are then discussed in the context of the inter-provincial ranking of poverty in South Africa in 1995-6. It turns out that this ranking is fairly robust, and that some important policy-relevant results about the distinction between ‘income’/‘expenditure’ and ‘human’ poverty for the South African context are reinforced rather than undermined by checking for robustness. In particular, while KwaZulu Natal is in the best three in terms of the standard expenditure measures for various choices of poverty line, it is third worst in terms of all the multi-dimensional rankings presented here.
Subjects:Human Poverty Index
Borda ranking
South Africa
JEL:D60
I31
I32
ISBN:9291906247
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:WIDER Research Papers, United Nations University (UNU)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
391509586.pdf227.84 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/63418

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.