EconStor >
Federal Reserve Bank of New York >
Staff Reports, Federal Reserve Bank of New York >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/62940
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChakrabarti, Rajashrien_US
dc.contributor.authorRoy, Joydeepen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-28en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T13:06:01Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T13:06:01Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/62940-
dc.description.abstractLocal financing of public schools in the United States leads to a bundling of two distinct choices - residential choice and school choice - and has been argued to increase the degree of socioeconomic segregation across school districts. A school finance reform, aimed at equalization of school finances, can in principle weaken this link between housing choice and choice of schools. In this paper, we study the impacts of the Michigan school finance reform of 1994 (Proposal A) on spatial segregation. The reform was a state initiative intended to equalize per-pupil expenditures between Michigan school districts and reduce the role of local financing. We find that Proposal A was responsible for increases in the value of housing stock in the lowest-spending school districts, and for improvements in several socioeconomic indicators in these districts, implying a decline in neighborhood sorting. We also find that the reform affected dispersion of incomes and educational attainment within school districts, increasing within-district heterogeneity in the lowest-spending school districts, while decreasing the same in the highest-spending districts. However, there is continued high demand for residence in the highest-spending communities, suggesting the importance of neighborhood peer effects (local social capital) and implying that even a comprehensive government aid program can fail to make a large impact on residential segregation.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherFederal Reserve Bank of New York New York, NYen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesStaff Report, Federal Reserve Bank of New York 565en_US
dc.subject.jelH4en_US
dc.subject.jelI2en_US
dc.subject.jelR2en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordspatial segregationen_US
dc.subject.keywordschool finance reformen_US
dc.subject.keywordtiebout sortingen_US
dc.subject.keywordpeer effectsen_US
dc.titleHousing markets and residential segregation: Impacts of the Michigan school finance reform on inter- and intra-district sortingen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn722363761en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:Staff Reports, Federal Reserve Bank of New York

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
722363761.pdf455.96 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.