Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/62921
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorQin, Duoen_US
dc.contributor.authorCagas, Marie Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorQuising, Pilipinasen_US
dc.contributor.authorHe, Xinhuaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T13:02:04Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T13:02:04Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/62921-
dc.description.abstractInvestment-driven growth has long been regarded as a key development strategy in China. This paper investigates empirically the validity of this view. Post-1990 data analyses and macroeconometric model simulations show that market demand has become a regular force in driving investment since reforms, that non-demand-driven investment growth contributes to increasing capital-output ratio far more than output growth, that government investment exerts a pivotal role in amplifying investment cycles, albeit effective in promoting employment, and that delayed and rising consumption from current investment surge can help sustain the impact of growth even with constant-returns-to-scale in the long-run GDP.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aQueen Mary, Univ. of London, Dep. of Economics |cLondonen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aWorking Paper, Department of Economics, Queen Mary, University of London |x545en_US
dc.subject.jelE22en_US
dc.subject.jelE62en_US
dc.subject.jelR34en_US
dc.subject.jelO23en_US
dc.subject.jelP41en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordInvestment, Growth, Impulse response function, Cointegration, Granger non-causalityen_US
dc.subject.stwInvestitionen_US
dc.subject.stwWirtschaftswachstumen_US
dc.subject.stwKointegrationen_US
dc.subject.stwChinaen_US
dc.subject.stwMakroökonomischer Einflussen_US
dc.titleHow much does investment drive economic growth in China?en_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn497586398en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US

Files in This Item:
File
Size
701.15 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.