Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/62663
Authors: 
Putterman, Louis
Weil, David N.
Year of Publication: 
2008
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, Brown University, Department of Economics 2008-15
Abstract: 
We construct a matrix showing the share of the year 2000 population in every country that is descended from people in different source countries in the year 1500. Using this matrix, we analyze how post-1500 migration has influenced the level of GDP per capita and within-country income inequality in the world today. Indicators of early development such as early state history and the timing of transition to agriculture have much better predictive power for current GDP when one looks at the ancestors of the people who currently live in a country than when one considers the history on that country's territory, without adjusting for migration. Measures of the ethnic or linguistic heterogeneity of a country's current population do not predict income inequality as well as measures of the ethnic or linguistic heterogeneity of the current population's ancestors. An even better predictor of current inequality in a country is the variance of early development history of the country's inhabitants, with ethnic groups originating in regions having longer histories of agriculture and organized states tending to be at the upper end of a country's income distribution. However, high within-country variance of early development also predicts higher income per capita, holding constant the average level of early development.
Subjects: 
Economic Growth
Migration
Income Inequality
State History
Linguistic Distance
JEL: 
F22
N30
O40
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
1.36 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.