Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/62570
Authors: 
Lacetera, Nicola
Macis, Mario
Stith, Sarah S.
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Paper series, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 6814
Abstract: 
In an attempt to alleviate the shortfall in organs and bone marrow available for transplants, many U.S. states passed legislation providing leave to organ and bone marrow donors and/or tax benefits for live and deceased organ and bone marrow donations and to employers of donors. We exploit cross-state variation in the timing and passage of such legislation to analyze its impact on organ donations by living and deceased persons, on measures of the quality of the organs transplanted, and on the number of bone marrow donations. We find that these provisions did not have a significant impact on the quantity of organs donated. The leave legislation, however, did have a positive impact on bone marrow donations. We also find some evidence of a positive impact on the quality of organ transplants, measured by post-transplant survival rates. Our results suggest that these types of legislation work for moderately invasive procedures such as bone marrow donation, but may be too low for organ donation, which is riskier and more burdensome to the donor.
Subjects: 
incentives
altruism
organ donation
bone marrow donation
JEL: 
D64
H41
I12
J18
K32
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
282.05 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.