EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/62537
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, David W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchurer, Stefanieen_US
dc.contributor.authorShields, Michael A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-25en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-14T11:07:35Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-14T11:07:35Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/62537-
dc.description.abstractUsing data from the 1970 British Cohort Study, we investigate the role of maternal gender role attitudes in explaining the differential educational expectations mothers have for their daughters and sons, and consequently their children's later educational outcomes and labour supply. We find that mothers' and children's gender role attitudes, measured some 25 years apart, are significantly correlated, equally so for sons and daughters. Moreover, daughters are significantly more likely to continue school beyond the minimum school-leaving age, participate in the labour force, and work more hours, if their mothers held non-traditional (pro-gender-equality) beliefs, even if they were not working themselves. Consistent with the hypothesis that maternal gender role attitudes affect daughters' economic opportunities only, we find no effect on sons' education outcomes and labour supply. However, we find that mothers' attitudes are significantly correlated with sons' partners' (daughter-in-law) labour supply. All these results suggest that the intergenerational transmission of non-traditional attitudes from mothers to their children explain a substantive part of gender inequalities in economic opportunities, and that attitudes and outcomes persevere across generations through assortative mating.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherIZA Bonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDiscussion Paper series, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 6656en_US
dc.subject.jelJ62en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordmaternal gender role attitudesen_US
dc.subject.keywordintergenerational transmissionen_US
dc.subject.keywordlabour supplyen_US
dc.subject.keywordhuman capital investmenten_US
dc.subject.keywordexpectationsen_US
dc.subject.keywordcohort dataen_US
dc.subject.stwMütteren_US
dc.subject.stwGeschlechten_US
dc.subject.stwSoziale Rolleen_US
dc.subject.stwBildungsverhaltenen_US
dc.subject.stwKinderen_US
dc.subject.stwGenerationenbeziehungenen_US
dc.subject.stwBildungsinvestitionen_US
dc.subject.stwArbeitsangeboten_US
dc.subject.stwSchätzungen_US
dc.subject.stwGroßbritannienen_US
dc.titleMaternal gender role attitudes, human capital investment, and labour supply of sons and daughtersen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn71815729Xen_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
71815729X.pdf283.16 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.