EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/62531
  
Title:Do employees profit from profit sharing? Evidence from Canadian panel data PDF Logo
Authors:Long, Richard J.
Fang, Tony
Issue Date:2012
Series/Report no.:Discussion Paper series, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 6749
Abstract:Using panel data from a large sample of Canadian establishments, this paper examines whether employee earnings increase, decrease, or do not change in the period subsequent to adoption of profit sharing, relative to establishments that do not adopt profit sharing. Our research contributes to knowledge by utilizing longitudinal analysis to assess the effects of profit sharing adoption on employee earnings growth within a carefully constructed sample of Canadian establishments, and by assessing both cash real earnings growth and total real earnings growth, while controlling for a wide array of variables that may affect these results. On average, employees in Canadian establishments that adopted profit sharing during 1999-2001 appeared to benefit from the introduction of profit sharing, in terms of both their cash real earnings growth and total real earnings growth, in the five-year span following introduction of profit sharing. This advantage was both statistically and practically significant, adding about 15 percentage points to real employee earnings growth over the five-year period, a period during which employee earnings growth was generally modest.
Subjects:profit sharing plans
employee earnings
firm-worker linked survey
Canada
JEL:J33
J31
J38
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
720552486.pdf291.26 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/62531

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.