EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/62522
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWunnava, Phanindra V.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-28en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-14T11:07:18Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-14T11:07:18Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/62522-
dc.description.abstractBased on data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth covering years 2000 through 2008, it is evident that both male and female workers in medium/larger establishments receive not only higher wages but also have a higher probability of participating in benefit programs than those in smaller establishments. This reinforces the well-documented 'size' effect. Further, the firm size wage effects are much larger for men than women. The union wage effect decreases with establishment size for both genders. This supports the argument that large nonunion firms pay higher wages to discourage the entrance of unions (i.e., the 'threat' effect argument). In addition, the union wage premium is higher for males for small and medium firm sizes relative to females. This implies that unions in the large establishments may have a role to play in achieving a narrowing of the gender union wage gap. In other words, the threat of unionization could reduce union wage premiums for both genders as firm size increases. Given the presence of noticeable gender differences in estimated union effects on the different components of the compensation structure, unions should not treat both genders similarly with respect to wages and benefits.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherIZA Bonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDiscussion Paper series, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 6779en_US
dc.subject.jelJ16en_US
dc.subject.jelJ31en_US
dc.subject.jelJ32en_US
dc.subject.jelJ51en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordsize effecten_US
dc.subject.keywordthreat effecten_US
dc.subject.keywordrandom effectsen_US
dc.subject.keywordfringe benefitsen_US
dc.subject.keywordcompensationen_US
dc.subject.keywordgenderen_US
dc.subject.keywordunion-nonunionen_US
dc.titleRecent longitudinal evidence of size and union threat effects across gendersen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn722415532en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
722415532.pdf228.88 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.